The best neighborhoods to explore in London

If you are moving to London to become a senior executive, you can rent a house in one of the city’s most affluent neighborhoods, such as Notting Hill Knightsbridge, located south of Hyde Park. If this is not the case, and if you prefer a popular and affordable neighborhood at the same time, note that Bromley, ranked as one of the most pleasant places to live in London according to the Office for National Statistics, does not is only 15 minutes from the center of Victoria.

As for Redbridge, located on the Central Line and near Shoreditch and its nightlife, there are houses at a reasonable price. If you are moving to London with your family, Sutton will delight your children with its present nature and one of the lowest crime rates in the English capital.

West London

West London is popular with many Londoners and expatriates, attracted by its lush parks, iconic architecture, high-class schools and chic atmosphere. There are more than 60 neighborhoods in West London and here are the most inescapable, if the budget is not your main concern.

Kensington and Chelsea

It’s at King’s Road, the street that runs through Chelsea and Fulham, that everything happens with many cafes, lively bars and shops. In addition to a hectic social life, culture is omnipresent, with the famous contemporary art gallery Saatchi, some theaters and Curzon cinema, with over 80 years of cinematographic heritage. If you work in North or South London, do not forget that the transport links from Sloane Square Station are not excellent.

Notting Hill

Everyone agrees that Notting Hill has a bohemian aura between its vintage shops and the stalls of Portobello Road, not forgetting the famous August Notting Hill annual carnival dedicated to the West Indian culture. Accessibility (Notting Hill underground station is on all the lines in the center, circle and district) and its reputation as a sought-after neighborhood explain why rental is about 90% higher than the London average.

Fulham

Fulham is also very close to the bustling King’s Road and Sloane Square, the epicenter of upscale shopping and dining. Fulham has its own social life with cafes, restaurants and parks. Note that the Chelsea and Fulham football clubs are located in the area, resulting in cluttered and noisy traffic on game days.

Hammersmith

Hammersmith has it all: the atmosphere in the shops, restaurants, bars and concert halls is relaxed thanks to the proximity to the Thames. Hammersmith is also home to the headquarters of international companies such as L’Oreal and Disney, making it the ideal venue for young professionals looking for modern housing. Hammersmith is ideal for those who work at the intersection of the District, Piccadilly, Circle and Hammersmith lines, not forgetting the large bus station.

Chiswick

Chiswick is popular with affluent families because of its safe environment, slow pace, green spaces and well-known elementary schools. In addition, London is less than half an hour away.

North London

North London, consisting of six districts with 1.4 million inhabitants, embodies the glamorous side of the city, but with fewer high-end shops. You will find along Green Lanes, one of the longest streets in London (about 10 km), foreign restaurants and independent and varied shops.

Islington

Islington, once an overcrowded suburb, has become an elite neighborhood. Islington Upper Street has independent stores and trendy boutiques, as well as foreign and other casual restaurants for the most sophisticated taste buds. Connectivity is one of the best arguments in this area: from Highbury & Islington Tube Station, you can reach the bustling Oxford Circus in just seven minutes.

Bloomsbury

By choosing Bloomsbury, you will discover an enriching, eye-catching neighborhood that has it all: the British Museum with its ancient treasures, welcoming cafés, good restaurants, bookstores, the famous UCL and many green spaces. In Bloomsbury, the car is not needed as the center of London can be reached on foot or by bike. You can also take the metro from one of the closest stations: Tottenham Court Road, Holborn, Russell Square, Kings Cross & St Pancras or Chancery Lane.

King’s Cross

King’s Cross takes its name from the statue of King George IV at the junction of Euston, York Way, Pentonville and Grays Inn Streets. Although the monument only remained there for nine years to be demolished in 1845, the district has kept its name. King’s Cross Tube Station opened in 1852. As the largest railway station in the country, it has made King’s Cross a hub for transportation, a title recently reinforced by the Eurostar terminal. Better yet, the region is not limited to good national and international transport links. Examples include shopping, on the well-preserved Victorian viaducts, renamed Coal Drops Yard.

Camden Town

Camden Town is best known for its markets (Camden Lock, Buck Street and Stables Market), Camden Lock Village and the Proud Gallery which has an extensive collection of photographs dedicated to fashion and music. The district is also home to a wide variety of concert halls, earning it the title of heart of the London music scene. However, if you’re not a night owl, you’ll probably enjoy picnicking at Regent’s Park, where London Zoo is located.

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